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J Korean Soc Matern Child Health > Volume 16(2); 2012 > Article
Journal of The Korean Society of Maternal and Child Health 2012;16(2):263-273.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21896/jksmch.2012.16.2.263    Published online July 31, 2012.
Depression, Stress and How They are Related with Health Behaviors and Metabolic Syndrome among Women Over 40 Years
전진혁1, 김성희2
1대구가톨릭대
2대구카톨릭대학교
40세 이상 여성에서 우울, 스트레스와 건강행동 및 대사증후군의 관련성
전진혁1, 김성희2
1대구가톨릭대
2대구카톨릭대학교
Abstract
Objectives
In this study, the relationship between psychologic factors (depression and stress) and health behaviors, metabolic syndrome were evaluated.
Methods
The study population was 1,559 women, aged over 40 years, April to December in 2009. We used modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel-III (modified NCEP ATP-lll) criteria for metabolic syndrome, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D) for depression and Psychosocial Wellbeing Index-Short Form (PWI-SF) for stress. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used to compare the mean scores of depression, stress by the number of metabolic syndrome components present. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the variables associated with depression, stress, health behaviors and metabolic syndrome.
Results
The prevalence of depression, stress and metabolic syndrome were 18.8%, 15.8%, 22.1%. Metabolic syndrome and negative health behaviors were more frequently observed in depressed and stressed groups. CES-D and PWI-SF scores increased with the number of components metabolic syndrome present. After covariates (age, education) adjusted, the odds ratios of bad health behaviors with depression and stress were 1.67 (95% CI=1.21~2.28) and 2.77 (95% CI=1.15~ 2.55). After covariates (age, education, BMI, smoking, drinking, exercise) adjusted, the odds ratios of metabolic syndrome with depression and stress were 1.48 (95% CI=1.07~2.06) and 1.75 (95 % CI=1.23~2.48).
Conclusion
Depression and stress were independently associated with health behaviors and metabolic syndrome.
Key Words: depression, stress, health behaviors, metabolic syndrome


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